Share

Immigration Relief Matters

Saturday, July 18, 2015

TPS Issued by USCIS for Nepal

DHS Announces Temporary Protected Status Designation for Nepal

Release Date: June 24, 2015

WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson announced his decision to designate Nepal for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 18 months based on the conditions resulting from the devastating magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on April 25, 2015, and the subsequent aftershocks. As a result, eligible nationals of Nepal residing in the United States may apply for TPS with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The Federal Register notice published today provides details and procedures for applying for TPS.

The TPS designation for Nepal is effectivetoday, June 24, 2015, and will be in effect through December 24, 2016. The designation means that, during the designated period, eligible nationals of Nepal (and people without nationality who last habitually resided in Nepal) will not be removed from the United States and may receive an Employment Authorization Document (EAD). The 180-day TPS registration period begins June 24, 2015 and runs through December 21, 2015.

To be eligible for TPS, applicants must demonstrate that they satisfy all eligibility criteria, including that they have been both “continuously physically present” and “continuously residing” in the United States sinceJune 24, 2015.Applicants also undergo thorough security checks. Individuals with certain criminal records or who pose a threat to national security are not eligible for TPS. The eligibility requirements are fully described in the Federal Register notices and on the TPS Web page at www.uscis.gov/tps.

Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all TPS-related fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject any TPS application that does not include the required filing fee or a properly documented fee-waiver request. All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.

Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833) at no cost.

For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook(/uscis), and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

This news release is also available in Nepali.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 06/26/2015

Friday, July 17, 2015

USCIS Seeks Comments on Proposed Expansion of Eligibility for Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers

USCIS Seeks Comments on Proposed Expansion of Eligibility for Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers

USCIS is seeking public comments on a proposed rule that would expand eligibility for provisional waivers of inadmissibility based on the accrual of unlawful presence. The proposed rule would expand eligibility to all foreign nationals who are statutorily eligible for an immigrant visa and for a waiver of inadmissibility based on unlawful presence.

Read the advance version of the notice of proposed rulemaking: Expansion of Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers of Inadmissibility. Once the notice of proposed rulemaking is published in the Federal Register, the public will have 60 days from the date of publication to comment. To submit comments, follow the instructions in the notice.

The changes, proposed in the interests of family unity and to enhance customer service, would take effect on the date indicated in the final rule when the final rule is published in the Federal Register.

Currently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) allows certain immediate relatives – specifically certain parents, spouses and children of U.S. citizens -- who are in the United States to request a provisional unlawful presence waiver before departing for consular processing of their immigrant visas. The waiver currently is only available to those immediate relatives whose sole ground of inadmissibility would be unlawful presence under section 212(a)(9)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act and who can demonstrate that the denial of the waiver would result in extreme hardship to their U.S. citizen spouse or parent.

Under the proposed rule, USCIS may grant a provisional waiver to foreign nationals if they are statutorily eligible for an immigrant visa and for a waiver of inadmissibility based on unlawful presence. The proposed rule also would expand who may be considered a qualifying relative for purposes of the extreme hardship determination to include lawful permanent resident spouses and parents.  

These proposed changes do not take effect with the publication of the notice of proposed rulemaking. When the final rule is published, the final rule will indicate the date on which foreign nationals may begin to apply for provisional unlawful presence waivers under the changes.

At this time, foreign nationals should not submit applications requesting provisional unlawful presence waivers based on the proposed changes. USCIS may deny any such application filed before the effective date indicated in the final rule, once the final rule is published.

For more information, see the Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers page.


Saturday, April 18, 2015

Will the President's Diplomacy with Cuba Effect Immigrants from Cuba?

The Cuban Adjustment Act of 1966 has allowed hundreds of thousands Cubans as well as their spouses and children to obtain permanent residence in America after settling in the country. However, many awaiting their green cards are now in fear that this act will be abolished as the U.S. and Cubans restore diplomatic relations.

While these concerns may be justified, experts believe that it's unlikely the Cuban Adjustment Act will go away anytime soon. Simply stated, there are an overwhelming amount of things that will need to be done before the Cuban Adjustment Act could be repealed. In order for this to happen the president and Congress need to work together in determining that Cuba has a democratically elected government – which is not likely to happen anytime soon.

There are two main paths that could lead to a nullification or repeal of the act and that would devastate Cubans awaiting green card approval:

  1. If a congressional action specifically repealed the law
  2. If the president submitted a determination to Congress that Cuba was being controlled by a democratically elected government

It is important to note that neither of these circumstances are likely. However, at some point in the future, there could be repercussions for Cubans living in the U.S. who are under deportation orders.

If you believe that the Cuban Adjustment Act can help you or a family member obtain legal status in the United States, or if you need more information about how you can obtain legal status in the U.S. contact one of our 3 offices in California, New York or New Jersey at 855-636-3889 to schedule an appointment with an experienced immigration attorney.


Thursday, November 20, 2014

Obama's Immigration Executive Order

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/obamas-immigration-order-poses-political-challenges-for-both-parties/2014/11/19/9f98c124-701d-11e4-ad12-3734c461eab6_story.html

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Relief for West Africa - Ebola Outbreak

 Ebola Outbreak-related Immigration Relief Measures to Nationals of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone Currently in the United States

Release Date: August 15, 2014

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is closely monitoring the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. USCIS offers relief measures to nationals of those three countries who are currently in the United States.

Immigration relief measures that may be available if requested include:

  • Change or extension of nonimmigrant status for an individual currently in the United States, even if the request is filed after the authorized period of admission has expired;
  • Extension of certain grants of parole made by USCIS;
  • Expedited adjudication and approval, where possible, of requests for off-campus employment authorization for F-1 students experiencing severe economic hardship;
  • Expedited processing of immigrant petitions for immediate relatives (currently in the United States) of U.S. citizens;
  • Expedited adjudication of employment authorization applications, where appropriate; and
  • Consideration for waiver of fees associated with USCIS benefit applications.

To learn more about how USCIS provides assistance to customers affected by unforeseen circumstances in their home country, visit www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/special-situations.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov, call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283, or follow USCIS on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

 

http://www.uscis.gov/news/alerts/ebola-outbreak-related-immigration-relief-measures-nationals-guinea-liberia-and-sierra-leone-currently-united-states


Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Relief for West Africa - Ebola Outbreak

 Ebola Outbreak-related Immigration Relief Measures to Nationals of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone Currently in the United States

Release Date: August 15, 2014

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is closely monitoring the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. USCIS offers relief measures to nationals of those three countries who are currently in the United States.

Immigration relief measures that may be available if requested include:

  • Change or extension of nonimmigrant status for an individual currently in the United States, even if the request is filed after the authorized period of admission has expired;
  • Extension of certain grants of parole made by USCIS;
  • Expedited adjudication and approval, where possible, of requests for off-campus employment authorization for F-1 students experiencing severe economic hardship;
  • Expedited processing of immigrant petitions for immediate relatives (currently in the United States) of U.S. citizens;
  • Expedited adjudication of employment authorization applications, where appropriate; and
  • Consideration for waiver of fees associated with USCIS benefit applications.

To learn more about how USCIS provides assistance to customers affected by unforeseen circumstances in their home country, visit www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/special-situations.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov, call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283, or follow USCIS on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

 

http://www.uscis.gov/news/alerts/ebola-outbreak-related-immigration-relief-measures-nationals-guinea-liberia-and-sierra-leone-currently-united-states





© 2019 Law Offices of Keith R. Campbell | Disclaimer
400 Corporate Pointe, Suite 300, Culver City, CA 90230
| Phone: 310-736-3889
59 Main Street, Suite 208, West Orange, NJ 07052
| Phone: 855-636-3889 | 973-436-1599

US Immigration | Jamaica Areas of Practice | New Jersey Areas of Practice | US immigration | Our Team

FacebookTwitterLinked-In Company

Legal Web Design By
Zola Creative Media